Providing Customized Solutions for your Association to create a efficient, productive, and prosperous organization

  • 13 Aug 2018 3:07 PM | Anonymous

    In the summer following my sophomore year of high school, I started my first “real job.” Like many teenagers, I went to work for a famous fast food establishment. And, like many teenagers, I had little use for the miscellaneous pearls of wisdom and motivational platitudes frequently dispensed by those in positions of authority, including the store managers. After a few weeks on the job, I developed a special disdain for a placard the franchise owner had affixed high upon a wall in the back of the restaurant, near the dishwashing station. In glaring, oversized font, the sign read, “Rule #1: The Customer is always right. Rule #2: If the Customer is wrong, refer to Rule #1.”

    Whoever came up with that sign, I would think to myself during those first few weeks, certainly never worked here. It seemed impossible to do anything quickly enough to make customers happy. They complained that the line moved too slowly. They complained that it took too long to enter orders into the register. Even the customers who took minute after minute to count out and then pay with hundreds of pocket lint-studded pennies (and there were many of them) complained when their orders weren’t ready in a matter of seconds.

    In those summer months I often worked as a closer, waiting on customers or cooking food for six hours, followed by two hours spent mopping, scraping, and scrubbing. I have vivid memories of long summer days spent taking orders from chronically impatient patrons, followed by evening hours spent plunging my hands into scalding water to scrub grease-encrusted cooking implements. Whenever I’d catch a glimpse of that sign, I would grumble under my breath, “Yeah, right!” After every shift that summer, I was convinced anew that the sign was mocking me.

    After one especially frustrating lunch shift that involved an exploding milkshake machine, I’d had enough and decided the sign needed to go. I retrieved a ladder from the storage room and proceeded to ascend toward the offending sign. At the very moment I reached the ladder’s apex, I heard a vaguely familiar voice call out from below, “What are you doing up there?” I looked down to discover the face of the franchise owner staring up at me. With comically perfect timing, he had arrived to perform a surprise inspection.

    In hindsight, it’s easy to see that I wasn’t exactly thrilled to be spending my summer shuffling between a cash register and a fry station when so many of my peers were enjoying more leisurely pursuits. That summer, I too often let youthful disgruntlement color my perceptions when it came to customer interactions. In reality, there were usually only a handful of impolite customers each day. Most of the people I dealt with were perfectly pleasant, even if they occasionally expected their orders to be ready almost instantaneously (it was, after all, a “fast food” establishment). Instead of viewing the job as an opportunity to hone my communication and customer relationship skills, I allowed myself to view each interaction as a nuisance.

    When I came down from the ladder, I mumbled something about having to straighten the sign. The franchise owner laughed knowingly and said, “You know, I don’t actually believe the customer is always right. And you don’t have to believe it either. But if your actions convince each customer that you believe it, you’ll do well in business.”

    I appreciated his candor, and from that day forward I made an effort to put his words into practice. I adjusted my attitude. I tried harder to see things from the customer’s perspective. And, every once in a while, when customers did get on my nerves, I used those moments as opportunities to work on skills that might come in handy later in life. I stayed at the job for two more summers and even received a small college scholarship from the franchise owner at the conclusion of my senior year.

    Providing excellent customer service is obviously essential within the association management industry. Succeeding in this line of work requires being responsive to and respectful of our clients’ – and their members’ – questions, requests, suggestions, and even their occasional complaints. In the association world, our customers might not always be “right” in the sense that we may not always agree on the best course of action to meet a particular goal, or the time required to do so. But when they push back, when they challenge us to do better or work faster, they are “right” in a more important way: they are right to care about the outcomes we are charged with achieving on their behalf. Maybe there was something to that sign after all.


  • 29 Jun 2018 11:28 AM | Anonymous

    We are always looking for ways to increase our fundraising. Recruiting new donors is a prime focus, but there are ways that we can seriously impact the amount and frequency of donations from existing donors as well.

    There is an interrelationship between the number of times you contact or “touch” a donor or prospect and the amount of the gift(s) they give. And if your primary focus is to only show your gratitude during those contacts, the donations will increase exponentially.

    Example: I worked with one nonprofit group that made a point to thank and appreciate their donors without asking for anything else in return. The staff of this organization brought together a group of members (The Gratitude Committee), volunteers, board members and staff, who were passionate about their cause…and who enjoyed talking on the telephone. The group objective was to call members, visitors, and donors just to thank them for their support – whether it be money, volunteering, prayers, etc. - and to have a minimum of 3 contacts with each person through the year.

    Methodology, On the initial call, they did not ask for anything, instead expressing gratitude and a sincere appreciation for their support. In fact, when people they called asked if they were calling for a donation, the team members clearly explained that was not the purpose of the call. This may sound counter-intuitive, but this group found many of their donors and visitors were shocked when they were thanked and not asked for anything else.

    On future contacts, the objective was still to show gratitude and not ask for donations. This group made the Thank You phone calls, sent a hand-signed and addressed Thanksgiving card in November, made calls to personally invite people to free events, tours and more.

    Results: So how were their results? The Gratitude Team worked in conjunction with several other groups and projects, so it is tough to pin down the specifics. But here are some of the things we saw:

    • The phone calls were the talk of the town!
    • Some people who were called volunteered to help make calls.
    • Several business people in the organization started calling their own customers, just to thank them for their business.
    • Increased membership, from called to visitors to events, tours
    • Over a 2-year period, volunteers increased by 150%.
    • People made their Gratitude caller their “go-to” person in the organization.
    • 40% of donors who were contacted regularly became multi-year donors.

    With an Attitude of Gratitude, the sky is the limit for your fundraising. Use your imagination and go for it!

    Stay tuned for more….


  • 4 Jun 2018 4:59 PM | Anonymous

    We often find that catering can be somewhat overwhelming. Whether your company is ordering for a monthly meeting, annual conference or special event, there are ways to simplify your catering needs and save money. With literally hundreds of food options, spanning dozens of menus, it can be tough to determine where to start. So, we thought we would share some simple but effective ways to help.

    A good place to start is to understand the different types of catering. Each type has a slightly different type of planning, pricing, and ordering procedures. Once you can narrow down to one of these, it will help simplify your menu choices, while also saving you time and money on the ordering. Here are three basic types of catering to consider:

    Corporate Catering

    From small office meetings and trainings to large regional events, the ability to have great food delivered on site saves time and money while allowing you to focus on the more important task at hand. Continental breakfasts, box lunches and buffets are all popular for corporate catering.

    Social Event Catering

    From office birthday parties, staff fun days, member meet and greets to retirement parties, social events cover a wide range of events (and food). Appetizers, bartenders and edible centerpieces are just some of what you might see catered at events like these.

    Concession Catering

    Seasonal or major public events all fall into this category. This is where you will find lots of people. Planning for these takes a pro to make sure you have all the right menu choices for your audience.

    Now that you have your category determined, remember that you are in control of what you order. Sounds simple, right? The reality is with so many choices it’s easy to overlook your budget and end up with more food than you can afford or can eat!

    According to Randy Peters Catering, the following four tips will help you save you time and money when ordering for your event. Keep these in mind as you consider your next order:

    1. Know Your Guest Count – the #1 factor of your catering costs is based on how many you are feeding. You would be surprised how many people try to order when they don’t know how many people are coming. Knowing your guest count before you call to get an estimate will help you better budget and eliminate confusing and unnecessary menu changes at the last minute.
    1. Decide on Your Delivery Method – most people think catering only comes one way, but a good professional caterer will offer you up to 4 different ways to have your food delivered including:
      • Pick Up: you pick up the food at the caterer’s location. Not as common, but an option to save on your delivery fee or save time on a rush order.
      • Drop Off: One of the most common, particularly for corporate and social events, where the caterer simply delivers the food in disposable containers (foil pans, coffee boxes, etc).
      • Real Display: For buffets and banquets you may consider this option as the caterer will prepare the tables and food serving area including linen, glasses, tableware, etc.
      • Full Service: In addition to the real display, you can also choose to have the food professionally served and even cooked on site!
    2. How Do You Want to Enhance Your Event – Think of these like the “optional or upgrade items” you can choose to add to your event. Although this may not seem like much to do with the food, it’s an integral part of the event planning that any professional caterer should offer. Enhancements may include decorations, linen, china, servers, on-site chefs, bartenders, DJ, and more.
    3. Know Your Budget Before You Order – Although this is often the first thing you may think about, it’s often the last thing that is figured out. For most caterers, pricing is determined on a dollar/person pricing model. So, an easy way to create your budget is just to determine the total amount you want to spend and divide it by the estimated number of people. Having this number to start with will help the caterer get you more for your money.

    Remember, professional caterers are part artists and part service providers. The more information you can give them the better. Also having a great caterer on file is always an amazing resource.


  • 30 Apr 2018 3:26 PM | Anonymous

    Sometimes your organization is in need of some killer graphic design.  Whether you need a poster for an event, a design for your upcoming annual report or to spice up your social media imagery, an aesthetic presentation and visual appeal is essential. Plus, it just looks nicer.

    The problem arises when it comes time to decide how such needed skills will be paid for. You could hire a graphic design artist for your needed projects, but graphic design isn’t cheap! Project rates average anywhere from $20 to $300 per hour, assuming that the designer charges hourly (some designers charge a project-based fee, which could be even higher).

    I am fortunate in that I took it upon myself to pick up some graphic design skill sets, which have proven very beneficial for many of the non-profits I’ve worked with. I am proficient in the Adobe Creative Suite, which includes some excellent graphic design programs, but this software requires a very specific skill set and many people (including myself) struggle with just the basics. So what do you do when you’re on a budget and you need a quick flier design for your upcoming event? You use a DIY graphic design tool.

    DIY graphic design are simple-to-use web-based platforms that remove the barriers of complicated software, enabling just about anyone to create a beautiful design. The platforms are usually template-based with simple, customizable drag-and-drop features. Here’s a list of a few web-based DIY graphic design tools that will simplify your next graphic design project:

    Canva (free subscription available) – Canva is the big Daddy of DIY graphic design platforms. It’s the one I’ve used most extensively, and so far I have no complaints. They have an extensive gallery of templates to choose from. You can download your files as PDFs, JPEG, or PNG files and customize the design for just about anything – social media posting, flier, newsletter, card, poster.  I even took it upon myself to complete their user training program. Apparently, I’m now an advanced user.

    Easil (free subscription available) – Easil is a platform very similar to Canva. They have thousands of templates to choose from for just about any purpose, but also provide design assistance and offer full service printing too!

    Easel.ly (free subscription available) – Easil.ly is a DIY web-based graphic design tool created specifically for infographics. They offer an excellent non-profit discount rate (50%) for their pro accounts, which are already only $3 a month.  They do have a free subscription, but your access to templates is very limited. So far, I can’t determine that there’s any connection between Easil and Easel.ly – despite the similar names.

    Pic Monkey (paid only) – Pic Monkey is a photo editing tool that also includes graphic design features. The platform offers online photo editing, image retouching and collage making. They also have a print shop and offer online trainings for all their features. The only downside is there’s no free option. Their subscriptions start at $5.99/month.

    Be Funky (free subscription available) – Be Funky is a platform similar to Pic Monkey. It is targeted mostly to photo editing, with graphic design and collage maker features included. However, design is limited to things like geometric shapes, emoticons and stickers. This looks to be a great alternative to Adobe Photoshop.

    It’s great to see that there are innovative minds out there who want to simplify the design process. Nonprofits are no longer limited to paying for designers for graphic design services. Find the DIY platform that works for what you need, sign up and let your creative juices flow! 


  • 16 Apr 2018 8:05 AM | Anonymous

    As a Nonprofit, budget constraints are a constant hindrance. Fortunately Google for Nonprofits tries to remove those hindrances by offering their Basic package of G Suite to Nonprofits. One limitation worth mentioning up front is that this service is only available to 501c3’s.  If you are a c4 or c6, sorry to say, you will have to pay. That being said, there are some great benefits of using their service.

    Video – No doubt in today’s world video is becoming a requirement to engage with your audience. Google allows you, among other things, to use Youtube to take donations, and have access to their YouTube Spaces. (YouTube Spaces are venues around the globe that are for creators to utilize for creating new content). Just having access to YouTube for video storage is huge, it takes the burden off of your own computer or costly cloud storage for storing large files.

    Ad Grants – Google also allows 501c3’s to utilize their AdWords services. If you aren’t familiar with AdWords, it is how Google handles its online advertising (those ads you see on the side an top of the page when you do a google search). Once you sign up and are approved, you are given a $10,000 per month grant towards advertising. It is on a “use it or lose it” basis, so be sure to properly setup your keywords. It does take some time invested in setting it up and understanding the process. But usually once you have it setup, it takes minimal maintenance on a weekly or monthly basis.

    Designated Email - You also can get a custom email address for free. So instead of your email ending in @gmail.com, it would end with @yournamehere.org. This is a small but important factor in establishing your credibility  as a Nonprofit. You want to make sure your brand is being presented in a professional manner, especially if you are asking for donations.

    These are just a few of the highlights of Google’s Nonprofit program, there are many more resources they offer that can be found here https://www.google.com/nonprofits. They also have a large learning section that shows you step by step how to get started. Additionally, we here at SOS can also help you make the most of their services. Get in touch with us and let us know how we can help!


  • 5 Apr 2018 3:28 PM | Anonymous


    Recently I’ve attended a few industry conferences and they all have been chock-full of great information and what always seems to be a ‘hot topic’ are the industry apps.

    So, after much trial and error, I’ve put together a list of some of the current apps that help you stay organized, connected and informed.

    You can download these apps right to your smartphone or tablet and start using them right away.

    Here is my list of Smart Apps for Smart Devices:

    1. Icalendar – works on all apps across the board and you can share with everyone. It is a computer file format which allows Internet users to send meeting requests and tasks to other Internet users by sharing or sending files in this format through various methods.
    2. ATracker pro – works on what you’re doing with your schedule. ATracker is a time tracking application which is very easy to use and requires minimal setup. On the main screen, you see the complete user defined task list and the overview of today’s time spending. You can start/stop time recording simply by tapping a task.
    3. Producteev – A network is your company’s workplace on Producteev. It includes all your projects, tasks and collaborators in one convenient and easy-to-use interface. It can also manage your projects, tasks and priorities.
    4. iAnnotate – is all new and better than ever. It’s the best way to read, annotate, and share PDFs, Microsoft Office files, images and web pages! Over 1 million people turn to iAnnotate to take notes, sign agreements, highlight documents, insert stamps and more. New in v4: iPhone support, iPad Pro and multitasking support, automatic Apple Pencil detection, shape annotations, improved web markup, enhanced support for OneDrive (and OneDrive for Business), iCloud Drive, and iCloud backup
    5. GoToMeeting – web conferencing software makes it simple and cost-effective to collaborate online with colleagues and customers in real time.
    6. Join.Me or Zoom – Both are web-based video conference apps, so you can take a meeting in the comfort of your own home or on the road.

    These additional apps are for video and photos – they are amazing at keeping your videos sharp and organized. Check them out and see which one is right for you.

    Photo & Video

    • Photoshop / Adobe
    • Photo shot express
    • Mix and Fix – photoshop fix
    • imovie
    • Loopideo – use to loop video for looping video.
    • Shutterfly and Snapfish

    Travel

    • Trip tracker – Flight away – Flight Track – Gateguru
    • Waze
    • Airline apps
    • Parkmobile
    • Mobile passport

    Event & Social Media

    • Speed Test
    • Hootsuite and Apps
    • FB pages Manager
    • Eventbrite / evite
    • Rallyhood
    • Social tables

    Work/life Balance

    • Sleep cycle
    • Ibaby view
    • Cozi family organizer
    • Fry’s app
    • Wunderlist / Evernotes
    • Hub family Organizer
    • Fooducate
    • Wundermap (Accuweather)
    • Tile

    So, with my smart app list, you will be ready for any job that comes your way.


  • 5 Apr 2018 3:11 PM | Anonymous

    What do Alexander the Great, Alfred the Great and Catherine the Great all have in common? They were all considered to be great leaders – what made them great?


    Alexander the Great had incredible success as a military commander, due to his bold strategy, his ability to vary his tactics, and the loyalty of his troops. He was described as perceptive, logical and shrewd. He had a great thirst for knowledge, a love for philosophy and was an avid leader. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_the_Great. I’m sure having Aristotle himself as his personal mentor had its advantages.

    Alfred the Great was described as open-minded, an advocate for education, and an exceptional listener. He had a reputation as an educated, knowledgeable and merciful man. He improved the legal system, military structure and the quality of life for his people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great

    Catherine the Great had a reputation as a benefactor of the arts, literature, and education. Russia was revitalized under her reign and was recognized as one of the great powers of Europe. She was described as courageous, intelligent, logical, optimistic and ambitious. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_the_Great

    What qualities do they all have in common? Strategy, ambition, courage; knowledge and education; perception, logic; and the respect and admiration of the people around them.

    In my life, I can recall a few leaders who really made a positive impact. And all of those leaders shared the following qualities:

    • Commitment to the truth
    • Cultivate wisdom and education
    • Lead by example
    • Clarity of purpose and cause, shared vision
    • Consistency with decisions
    • Willing to make sacrifices, willing to take risks
    • Creative thinker, self-aware, perceptive
    • Vulnerability and humility
    • Listening and good communication
    • Integrity and strong moral character
    • Ability to innovate, adapt and collaborate; build relationships
    • Passion and inspiration
    • Encourage input, be open to change, empower people, team player

    Leadership is asking questions, building teams, building trust, and equipping others to lead. Leadership requires confidence, creativity, compassion, conviction, consistency, and the ability to influence others. BEING a leader is about building relationships and inspiring and engaging others.

    In nonprofits and associations, we use the term servant leader, which “focuses primarily on the growth and well-being of people and the communities to which they belong.” https://www.greenleaf.org/what-is-servant-leadership/

    A servant leader should have the following qualities:

    • Ability to listen effectively
    • Empathy, perceive others circumstances and points of view
    • Awareness of self and others
    • Healing influence, purpose and intention
    • Commitment to the growth of people and self
    • Building community, building trust
    • Persuasion and influence, attunement to others
    • Conceptualization, helping to shape the vision
    • Strategic foresight, envisioning the future
    • A culture of stewardship, caring for others

    Those of us privileged to serve in the nonprofit sector should strive to apply these qualities of leaders and servant leaders in our daily lives when dealing with family and friends, bosses and co-workers, colleagues, constituents and the general public.

    We may not get the term “the great” behind our names, but we should strive to be “great” at what we do.


  • 4 Apr 2018 12:41 PM | Anonymous

    I was at a conference a few years ago, and Brian Tracy was the Keynote speaker. Mr. Tracy spoke about frog eating.


    His program started with this: Mark Twain once said that if the first thing you do each morning is to eat a live frog, you can go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably the worst things that is going to happen to you all day long. Your “frog” is your biggest, most important task, the one you are most likely to procrastinate on if you don’t do something about it.

    I have tried to practice this approach ever since I heard him speak. I say try because I am not always successful.  Take this blog, for instance. I should have completed this a couple of weeks ago. Every morning I would come in and say to myself, write your blog first thing, eat that frog, and get it over with. Then I would look at email and let those smaller email items take over. I did that because I did not have a creative idea for a blog. If I had eaten that frog, looked around, thought about some of my client successes or issues, I could have come up with an idea. Instead, I willfully let myself get distracted. The distraction was not helpful, the blog got written late, I continued to be stressed out about it, my boss was not happy it was late, it has thrown the blog posting schedule off, and nothing was made better.

    I am going to get back to eating frogs first thing in the morning because our goal here at SOS is to make things better, better for our clients, better for each other, and better for the community.

    If you want to learn more about Mr. Tracy and why frog eating is important his website is here:  https://www.briantracy.com/blog/time-management/the-truth-about-frogs/

    A couple of other hints from Mr. Tracy:

    • If You Have To Eat Two Frogs, Eat The Ugliest One First
    • If You Have To Eat A Live Frog At All, It Doesn’t Pay To Sit And Look At It For Very Long

    Whew… this is now done, the frog is eaten, and I do feel better.


  • 1 Dec 2017 3:31 PM | Anonymous

    When building a board of directors in a for-profit business, you may tend to focus on investors, experienced chairmen or people who make meetings meaningful, and being significant value. It is not uncommon for board meetings to be dreaded, everyone fears long, drawn-out meetings with members bickering and grabs for power and control. Of course, not all boards suffer this same fate. “Boards are really at their best when they’re providing guidance and leadership and insight at a higher level,” president of the Center for Public Skills Training, Frank Martinelli states.

    However, building a board of directors in the non-profit world has some significant differences. These board members are simply volunteers, which can make building a successful board daunting. So, we ask ourselves: how can we fill a board, without simply filling seats? Chris Grundner, a non-profit pioneer, perfectly aligns this question with Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Often placed in a triangle, with our most fundamental human needs at the base, it begins with physiological needs like food and water. It’s followed by safety, social needs, esteem and finally self-actualization.

    The parallel Grundner creates in the non-profit world starts with passion at its base. He explains passion is essential for board members to have but it isn’t everything; things like showing up and financial contributions form a good basis for how a board should be built but it’s not enough to bring your non-profit to the pinnacle of success. To build on the base of passion, Grundner’s next criteria is standards and best practices, things like understanding their role and their legal responsibilities and to build on that adding job descriptions and term limits for your members. If you make exceptions for your board, the team and the mission will suffer as a result. When moving forward, the next step would be to establish a diversity of skill sets to hear all perspectives. As we encroach the peak of the triangle, planning for future board generations becomes crucial to success in order to not lose momentum during turnover.

    To sum this analogy up, Grundner uses three points: always raise the bar, hold the organization and its members responsible, and be all in for your organizations. Non-profits are the essence of social action and share the common mission of improving quality of life. We, as a society need them, so finding people that can help fill these needs is of great importance.


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